Why it is important not to ’round up’ your baby’s age

As I type my youngest child is three. It will be her fourth birthday next week. I’m resisting the urge to refer to her as ‘four’ or even ‘nearly four’. She is three, and I will only be able to say I have a three year old for another week. I’m making the most of it.

I’m not writing this to tell you to make the most of every minute or to tell you that babies grow so quickly or any of the other clichés. You know they grow quickly, I’m sure you are trying to make the most of it, and often those phrases aren’t helpful if you are struggling or in the midst of a difficult age or stage. It’s OK to say you miss the tiny newborn they were a few months ago or prefer the toddler you can see coming on the horizon. If I’m talking in cliché, I prefer ‘the days are long, the years are short’. It’s OK not to enjoy every minute.

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I’m actually saying this because it really, really matters from a safety and comfort point of view when fitting slings and carriers. We know all children are different, but the first question we will ask when fitting your carrier is the age of your child. When it comes to age recommendations for certain carriers of carrying methods, it’s super-important not to ‘round up’. And the younger your child, the more this is true.

Take for example a carrier which is suitable for babies from a minimum of 4 months of age. With 4 months as a minimum, it is unlikely to properly fit a baby of 12 or 14 weeks. I know it is such a short time and you want the carrier to last. But the younger a child is, the faster their weight and development are progressing – the more those weeks or months matter. If you go up the scale a little, in terms of length of time alive, saying a 3 month old is near enough 4 months is like saying a 14 year old is capable of the same things as a 20 year old, or that a 42 year old adult is nearly a pensioner. Fitting a carrier that is too large, or putting a baby in a carrying position not recommended for their age, has significant safety concerns. We know all babies are different, and the age guidelines are not set in stone. But they are there for a reason. The manufacturer’s guidelines and minimum age ranges are based on averages, sure, but also on distinct stages of child development.

As children grow, it is easy to assume that they will continue to grow at the same rapid rate as they did

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Fitting a 3.5yo.

in their first year. Growth slows through the toddler years, so rounding up at this age can also result in ill-fitting carriers, or in children not being carried at all. It’s easy to round up a 14 month old to 18 months to get a toddler carrier, find your new carrier a lot less comfortable, and conclude it’s because your child is older and heavier – but it may well be that the carrier is too large, resulting in poor weight distribution. Carrying can end before you would like it to by ’rounding up’ your child’s age.

On the other end of the scale, let take for example a carrier suitable to age 3. It’s tempting not to consider it for your child of 2 because you won’t get the use from it as you would have if you had bought earlier. Of course, if you consider it another way, you are considering a product which will last for half of your child’s life so far. ‘Rounding up’ here can prevent a year of carrying – a year is a huge amount of time for your child, and longer than most of their clothes and shoes will last!

When they are older, the same is true of weight limits in carriers. Getting a carrier with a 35lb upper weight limit when your child is already 25lb seems like it wouldn’t last that long. But consider average weight gain between 1st and 2nd birthdays is 7lb, and between 2nd and 3rd birthdays just 4lb – and that carrier can last you nearly two years. That’s like buying something at 20 years old and having it last until you are 60.

Not rounding up our babies isn’t about making the most of their childhood – it’s about making sure your carrying solutions are age appropriate, safe and comfortable. It won’t be the same for every child, but the starting point is always an accurate age!

All things being equal, the baby carrier industry is sexist.

I’ve started to write this several times, and I’ve always used too many words. Instead I’ve deleted the lot and put down two definite truths. Here they are.

As a sling library we first and foremost offer choice, and try to make carrying accessible to all.

One of the biggest barriers to doing this is gender stereotyping.

I could list how many times people pass over the carrier they want, that works for them, because of concerns about how it might look, how it might be perceived by others including their partners, because of its style, colour or print. I could, but the problem doesn’t lie with those endless debates on sling groups about whether you’d put a boy in a flowery carrier, it’s not about the patronising stereotypes of ‘husband-friendly’ carriers, or the damaging designation of buckle carriers as inherently male and flowing wraps and ring slings as inherently female. If you want to read more about the division this sexism causes, you might wander over to one of the excellent campaigns aimed at equality  – ‘Let Toys be Toys – for girls and boys’ or ‘Pink Stinks’. They are full of information about how damaging gender stereotyping is to boys, girls, men and women alike. But when it comes to the carrying industry, all we really need to know is this:

Gender stereotyping in carriers stops many people or families from carrying at all.
Gender stereotyping restricts the range of carriers available to individuals and often leads to less than optimal choices.

It begins with the designation of carrying as a female practice, the carrier industry as a female space. I very rarely write a blog piece directed at the carrying industry itself, but this is one area in which the industry as a whole can make a huge difference. It’s time to cast a gender-critical eye over the industry and speak honestly about what we see. How inclusive are we? It is not restricted to gender, of course, but that is what I want to speak about today. And this is what I want to say.

If your website refers to ‘mothers’ or ‘mothering’ and carrying as a tool for motherhood, without equal reference to fathers and any other extended family or caregiver who might be using a carrier, you are limiting your market.

If you use ‘ladies’, ‘mummies’ ‘mums’ or ‘mamas’ as a collective term for your attendees, or as a term of address for your audience, you are not being inclusive. 

If your carrier is size limited, and you use dress size, rather than body measurements, you are excluding men’s sizes and suggesting they are not your target market.

If your marketing includes only pictures of women using the carrier, or primarily women using the carrier, you are contributing to the idea of carrying as a female only practice.

If your marketing includes the idea that your carrier is ‘aimed at men’, ‘daddy-friendly’ or equivalent, you are being sexist in the way you portray your product.

If you categorise carriers by type, print or colour based on their blanket appeal to gender stereotypes, you are perpetuating the stereotype.

If you make assumptions about the types of carriers adults will want to see or use based on their gender, rather than their build, body type or stated preference, you are allowing gender stereotypes to unfairly influence your recommendations.

If, in relationships with families, you as habit speak firstly to one gender, or however subtly treat them as decision maker purely due to gender, you are influencing the gender dynamic negatively.

The designation of carriers as male or female prevents people, often men, from using them in the first place. From a carrier retail industry perspective, that is less sales, less customer satisfaction, more returns, greater aftercare and brand negativity. From a sling library industry perspective, it means times after time families missing out on carrying completely because it isn’t portrayed as being for them – or choosing the less optimal choice in terms of fit, suitability and budget because of a preconceived idea, borne out by the industry, that they are not making the ‘correct’ choice. From the perspective of supporting families to carry their children, no matter what that family dynamic, sexism is restricting choice, and it is restricting access, and it is exactly what any sling support industry professional should be trying to avoid.

Sexism in the carrier industry isn’t about not wanting to put your little girl in a space rocket print or worrying about handing down a pink wrap to a little brother. Those are symptoms of a much more worrying whole – families, or certain members of families, being excluded from carrying because it does not feel normal or accessible to them.

Families thrive on close relationships, in the early years founded on close physical contact, trust and proximity. There are many understandably female exclusive preserves in the pregnancy and nursery industry but it is very important, I believe, that the carrying industry is not one of them. If you are in the carrier industry, please be aware. Please strive to be part of the solution and make carrying accessible for everyone. If you are a consumer, and you see any of the above happening, or feel stereotyped or marginalised yourself, tell us. Tell the retailer. Tell the service provider. Speak.

Let carriers be carriers. For everyone.

Upper weight limits

Most carriers come with both lower and upper weight limits. In the sling library, we work for more often with the constraints of the lower limits, carriers suitable from 5lb, or 15lb, for example, work in very different ways. It is very important that a carrier is appropriate for the size of a child as well as offering growing room. But on our recent theme of toddler carriers, and even preschool sizes, the upper weight limits are what come into play.

How important are upper weight limits?

Observing the manufacturer’s upper weight limit is very important. Checking your carrier regularly for wear and tear if your child is approaching the weight limit is also a good idea. Ergonomic carriers are usually safety tested to a fairly high weight, and it is most common for a child to not need carrying any more before the weight limits comes into play. Nonetheless, it is a good idea to know the limit on the carrier you are using. Some carriers such as most brands of woven wrap have no practicable upper weight limit – as long as they are in good condition, the carrying strength of the adult is the only real limit. image

It is important to know that an upper weight limit does not mean a carrier is certified comfortable or safe up to that level. It is quite possible for a child to outgrow a carrier developmentally or in height well before they hit the upper weight limit.

What are the most common upper weight limits?

Different types of carrier tend to have different average limits. Front pack style carriers, with arm and leg holes, and a harness for the carrying adult, tend to have the lowest limits, as their way of distributing weight is not as effective as a more it doesn't matter how big they getergonomic option. Woven wraps and soft structured carriers tend to have the highest weight limits, with the toddler and preschooler size soft structured carriers having some of the highest. Upper weight limits are most often presented in pounds but we have referenced them in kilograms also.

 

So how long will my carrier last?

If you have a child who still wants to be carried, and you are happy to carry them, there are three main things to look for in how your carrier fits. Is the body height high enough, or can it become high enough via a headrest or adjustment, to support the child adequately? Your carrier should fit to firmly under the armpits as a minimum. Is the body width wide enough to support the legs, or can it be made wider using footrests like with the Boba 4G, or extenders such as the Tula Free to Grow width extensions? Ideally your child’s should be supported in a capital M shape. And what is the upper weight limit on your carrier? Is your child inside this limit?

As you can see in the following table, although all children are very different, in most cases upper weight limit is very generous and should last years, as well as inspire confidence in the structure and components of the carrier. Average weights taken from UK growth charts.

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Be safe, be snug, sometimes bigger kids need a carry too!

Buckle Carriers and Sizing

So that carrier comes in standard size, that one in toddler, that one adds a preschool size, who know what that’s about! That brand has all three but says the standard will suit toddlers, but if that were true why would they have a toddler size? What is a toddler anyway? A child who can walk – even if they are nine months old? Is is based on weight, age, or shoe size? I want something that is going to last. This is a one time only purchase. I don’t want it outgrown. That one says it suits to 35lb, is that realistic? How old is a 35lb child anyway? That one says 45lb, but looks smaller! That standard size has the same weight limit as that preschool carrier, how does that make sense? My baby has always been super chunky, do they need a toddler size? My baby is a little dot, will they ever need a size up? Does it matter how big I am? Why do some manufacturers make a toddler size and some don’t? Can you really carry a 45lb child anyway?!

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It’s confusing. We know! So here are the facts about buckle carriers and sizing.

1) Toddler sized carriers are a relatively new invention.

Although toddlers and preschoolers have always been carried, the ‘sizing up’ of existing buckle carriers into a larger toddler fit is something that has only really happened in the last ten years as the baby carrier industry has expanded. You might call it progress, you might call it marketing – in reality it is probably both. Most standards were designed to last years, not months – and a toddler sized carrier needs to be significantly larger than a standard size to make it worthwhile. And that’s pretty big.

2) There is a huge overlap between carrier sizes.

Most children will fit both sizes at least for a time. Many will fit two different sizes fine for years, leaving it entirely up to the carrying adult which they prefer.

3) Height matters more than weight.

A heavy baby needs a supportive carrier, for sure, so it is very important that it fits well. A carrier that is too big or too tall for the child will not fit well and make them feel even heavier than they are.

4) Fit matters more than anything else.

Firstly, fit is a safety issue. A carrier too large for a small baby can lead to slumping, problems with airway or abnormal restriction of movement. A carrier too small for a large child can lead to abnormal leaning, a fall risk, strains for the carrying adult and chafing for the child. But what is a good fit? Often, it has little to do with the carrier size and whether the panel is 14/15/16/17 inches wide or the same tall.

imageA carrier that fits a toddler well allows the child’s legs to be supported in an M shape – it does not have to have fabric tucked in to the back of each knee to achieve this. You can do the same thing by lifting a child’s legs into a seated position and adjusting the carrier waistband around you to hold them there without chafing. A carrier does not have to enclose the arms unless you both prefer it that way, but it should fit snugly underneath the armpits when the shoulder straps are flat on your shoulders.

Fitting the waistband at a different level, around the hips, allows for the full height of a carrier to be used to support the child. It also allows for the shoulder loops to tighten at an upward angle, which creates a snug band of support across the child’s shoulders and back, distributing the weight around the torso of the carrying adult.

A child’s torso should be parallel with your torso when in the carrier. A carrier that is imagetoo large allows the child to sit back in the carrier, angling away from you, because the panel is too wide for your shoulders. This is not good weight distribution and can be painful after a while.

5) If in doubt – size down.

I know, you want it to last. It will. But if it helps,think about it like this.

There are four sizes for buckle carriers, not three.

It’s important to know, when choosing your carrier, that how the carrier fits a tiny baby at the start makes an impact years later. If you divide buckle carriers up into three sections – baby, toddler, and preschooler, it is easy to see how you might size up a little early – for example, consider a toddler size for your eight month old because they are pulling up to stand, and you’ve already missed eight months of use and value from a baby size. However, if you divide it into four sections – infant, baby, toddler and preschooler – the picture changes.

Infant – birth to 4-6 months.
Baby – 6 months to 18-24 months.
Toddler – 18-24 months to 3-3.5 years.
Preschool 3-3.5 years to 5 years approx.

All of a sudden, your eight month old is firmly in the beginning of the baby size section, with lots of growing room. Some carriers achieve the infant fit by insert, cinching strap, cinching mechanism….some way of making your baby size carrier smaller. Babies need to grow into their baby size!

When we’re talking toddler sizes, it is much, much easier to get a smaller carrier to ‘grow’ than a too-big carrier to ‘shrink’ enough to provide adequate support.

The one thing that you can guarantee is, in the world of buckle carriers, it’s better to try on before you buy. Standard sizes can fit throughout your carrying years if you want them to – or you might size up. There will never be any substitute for a good fit!

Let’s see those pictures side by side. They are the same, standard sized carrier, carrying a child aged 3 years and 9 months. The only difference is the fit.

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News for 2016!

Tiny-Toes-logo1

The website is being reorganised as I type to reflect our new systems and locations for 2016!

The biggest news is the implementation of our computerised rental system – from January you will be able to register your details on a central site, allowing us to click rental items in and out at drop in sessions easily and quickly. The system can show you the full library collection and catalogue when you log in, allow you to renew your carrier online, and see live availability of the carriers you would like to rent. It will also email you reminders when your carrier is due back! We will be moving over to this system during the first months of 2016 and expect it to take a little longer initially but be super fast in the long term – so please be patient with us as we get used to it!

We are happy to announce we are expanding to cover more of Leeds in 2016. We are aiming to place drop in sessions at convenient locations around the city, so that users can more easily access sling and carrier services. The first place we are expanding to is Horsforth, and we will be starting a monthly drop in service at Tiny Toes Play Centre on the 20th January 10.30am-2pm. Tiny Toes is a play centre aimed at under 5s, and they are allowing us to use their home from home area to run drop in sling services. The drop in remains free, with free pick ups and drop offs, free entry for sling and play for babies under 12 months – and best of all half price entry for older ones who want to play! You can see more about the centre by clicking here.

Watch this space for the next venue announcement!

 

The Twelve Days of (Sling Library) Christmas

We are inviting anyone fancying a bit of a sing along to our Sling and Sing event in Leeds on Saturday 12th December. We’ll meet under the big tree in City Square at around 3pm, sing some lovely carols with our little ones keeping us warm and snug, and then have a walk around the lights and Christmas market. Totally festive! After our little get together, the Leeds festival of lanterns is taking place, so it couldn’t be more magical.

If you would like to join us, head over to our Facebook page and add your interest!

Carriers are available for hire of course prior to the event.

So, here’s a little warm up tune to get you started!

Enjoy!

On the first day of Christmas
At West Yorkshire Sling Library
All the parents happy hands free.

On the second day of Christmas
At West Yorkshire Sling Library
Two buckley hugs
All the parents happy hands free.

On the third day of Christmas
At West Yorkshire Sling Library
Three first smiles
Two buckley hugs
And all the parents happy hands free.

On the fourth day of Christmas
At West Yorkshire Sling Library
Four skin to skin
Three first smiles
Two buckley hugs
And all the parents happy hands free.

On the fifth day of Christmas
At West Yorkshire Sling Library
FIVE RING SLINGS
Four skin to skin
Three first smiles
Two buckley hugs
And all the parents happy hands free.
On the third day of Christmas
At West Yorkshire Sling Library

On the sixth day of Christmas
At West Yorkshire Sling Library
Six mei tais tying
FIVE RING SLINGS
Four skin to skin
Three first smiles
Two buckley hugs
And all the parents happy hands free.

On the seventh day of Christmas
At West Yorkshire Sling Library
Seven buckles clipping
Six mei tais tying
FIVE RING SLINGS
Four skin to skin
Three first smiles
Two buckley hugs
And all the parents happy hands free.

On the eighth day of Christmas
At West Yorkshire Sling Library
Eight pattern comparing
Seven buckles clipping
Six mei tais tying
FIVE RING SLINGS
Four skin to skin
Three first smiles
Two buckley hugs
And all the parents happy hands free.

On the ninth day of Christmas
At West Yorkshire Sling Library
Nine wraps a stretching
Eight pattern comparing
Seven buckles clipping
Six mei tais tying
FIVE RING SLINGS
Four skin to skin
Three first smiles
Two buckley hugs
And all the parents happy hands free.

On the tenth day of Christmas
At West Yorkshire Sling Library
Ten peers supporting
Nine wraps a stretching
Eight pattern comparing
Seven buckles clipping
Six mei tais tying
FIVE RING SLINGS
Four skin to skin
Three first smiles
Two buckley hugs
And all the parents happy hands free.

On the eleventh day of Christmas
At West Yorkshire Sling Library
Eleven toddlers calming
Ten peers supporting
Nine wraps a stretching
Eight pattern comparing
Seven buckles clipping
Six mei tais tying
FIVE RING SLINGS
Four skin to skin
Three first smiles
Two buckley hugs
And all the parents happy hands free.

On the twelfth day of Christmas
At West Yorkshire Sling Library
Twelve backs a patting
Eleven toddlers calming
Ten peers supporting
Nine wraps a stretching
Eight pattern comparing
Seven buckles clipping
Six mei tais tying
FIVE RING SLINGS
Four skin to skin
Three first smiles
Two buckley hugs
And all the parents happy hands free.

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Why winter coats and slings don’t mix!

So the weather has turned cold and we’re all wanting to keep our little ones nice and warm – especially the ones who haven’t experienced a British winter before! So how is best to keep them snuggly and safe at the same time? There’s an article and video that gets shared around a lot at this time of year, and it’s and important message – it’s called ‘Winter coats and car seats don’t mix

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The basic premise is that the more padding you add under safety straps, the less well the safety straps can do their job when needed. It’s a hard thing to think about, but very necessary. And in many ways the principle is the same with slings and carriers – the clothing interferes with the fit, makes the safety guidelines harder to follow, and can have issues with overheating.

Here are some reasons why coats and bulky clothing for babies aren’t always ideal and some things you can use instead!

In slings and carriers, babies benefit from your body heat. Imagine walking around on a snowy day strapped to giant hot water bottle! It can be a lovely feeling, but to benefit from that body heat your baby should be as close to your body as they can be – so put your carrier on at the earliest stage of getting dressed that you can, and add layers over the top – being careful that no layers obscure the baby’s face.

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Going outdoors and staying outdoors is the exception rather than the rule. Most of the time we’re outdoors for a bit, in a hot shopping centre for a bit, cold street, having a coffee, school run, back home, dog walk, corner shop… layers under the carrier mean to adjust the baby’s temperature you need to remove the baby from the carrier, disturbing them. Adding your own coat or a cover means outdoor layers are easily removable when entering a warmer environment, keeping baby at the ideal temperature – and meaning you’re not stuck in a coat under a sleeping baby either! You don’t need a special coat unless you want one. Most coats can do up around a baby just fine, and some will fasten under the baby’s bottom, making a great windbreak and covering small hands and feet. A small fleece pram blanket or simple woollen scarf tucked under your coat at the shoulders will cover pretty much any gap if required. Again, we keep baby’s face visible, their head kissable – but maybe add a hat!

Bulky clothes can reduce the support a carrier will offer to the spine and hips of the infant, leading them to slump down inside – a non- optimal position we are trying to avoid. Very small babies often disappear inside snow suits and similar items, with the neckline covering the face – an obvious hazard. Instead of bulky clothing, simple fleecey sleepsuits can work very well, with extra attention paid to any uncovered parts – the feet can benefit from an extra pair of socks, and the head from a hat – especially good are the types that cover the neck a little like a cardigan hood.

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Poncho type outerwear can be great for older babies, as they can be placed over the baby’s head and shoulders without removing them from the carrier. The poncho itself will cover most of the carrier, and they can be acquired in waterproof and warm varieties. They also look super cute at toddler age when they are walking independently!

Remember that when you share space with your baby you automatically keep yourself comfortable and your baby benefits too – you turn out of the wind and rain, shelter both of you, turn from direct lights, preserve your personal space in crowds, all without thinking about it.

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So here’s the rule of thumb!

If you wouldn’t let them wear it in the car seat, don’t use it in the carrier either.
Consider the carrier an outdoor layer, and your body heat another one.
Add layers until both of you are comfortable.
Keep your baby visible and kissable.
Check extremities regularly.

I confess I will miss my little hot water bottle under my coat this winter! It can be one of the loveliest, toastiest feelings to be out and about sharing space with your little ones, enjoying a secret warmth only you two can feel.

Christmas is Coming!

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It always seems like we have to plan these things early in the sling library but ho ho ho! It’s only a little over four weeks until Father Christmas is due, your relatives are descending and we all disappear under a mountain of wrapping paper and sprouts!

We close for two weeks over the festive period and give all our hirers a little Christmas bonus, extending all the hires over the holidays for free.

And that starts this week! All hires between 24th Nov-8th Dec will benefit from a little extra hire for no extra cost. The sooner you hire, the more extra free you get.

So are you taking your little ones away this Christmas? Want to keep them close when all the relatives visit? Need a hands free Christmas dinner? Or are you visiting the Christmas market, braving the shops, going to the theatre, carol singing, church services, Christmas fayres …..or just fancy keeping warm outside with a baby shaped hot water bottle down your jacket? Perhaps we’ll get some snowman building in there too!

Here are the dates for the last sessions before Christmas:

WEDS 25th NOV @ 55 Thornfield Ave 10-3pm
FRI 27th NOV @ Pudsey Wellbeing Centre 12-2.30pm
WEDS 2nd DEC @ 55 Thornfield Ave 10-3pm
WEDS 9th DEC @ 55 Thornfield Ave 10-3pm
FRI 11th DEC @ Pudsey Wellbeing Centre 12-2.30pm
WEDS 16th DEC @ SCRAP creative reuse art project 10.30-2pm

We reopen in the New Year on Tuesday 5th January, with some all new venues, some all new events and some all new stock – an exciting 2016 in the sling library! Watch this space for further news!

Liliputi Review

So the lovely folks at Liliputi have sent WYSL one of their new and shiny soft structured carriers – after a redesign it is always good to get feedback and we liked the look of the Liliputi SSC as soon as it came out of the box.

First of all, it is definitely pretty, the Folk Tale design on brown straps is bright and fun but not over the top. The carrier comes in a sleek box with a useful cotton storage bag.

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What does the Liliputi SSC do?

An ergonomically sound, soft buckle carrier suitable from newborn to toddler with front, hip or back carry options. The newborn adaptation is a soft, integral newborn seat, sold as standard not separately, which raises the little one up inside the carrier and tucks their legs inside. The newborn seat fastens to the side with slightly fiddly poppers, but has the added bonus of being attached with Velcro, and removable when the child no longer requires it.

A removable sleep hood is a great feature, and a sturdy zip holds it in place meaning there is no chance of it popping off accidentally. There is a small amount of padding to the curved headrest and fairly chunky padding to the sides around the backs of the baby’s knees. I like the way the central panel is light allowing parents to rub and pay their baby through the carrier. Overall the carrier is medium weight, not overly heavy but not a lightweight.

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The waistband is medium weight shaped foam, the straps offer a good set of configurations including crossing on the back, or using a connecting strap, and perfect fit adjusters at the top of the carrier body. The straps are overall fairly short, with a good minimum fit, making this a good choice for petite adults.

Extra features?

The carrier comes with seat extenders which zip into place, increasing the leg support as the child grows. I was impressed with how well these supported toddler legs. The attention to detail here is impressive, whenever there is a piece of webbing, there is something to tuck it into, the carrier feels sturdy and solid overall.

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Any downsides?

I really do like the Liliputi and think it will fit a broad range of adults and children. I think it has been cleverly designed by people who clearly know their stuff. There are only two small things I would change – the length of the webbing on end of the shoulder straps is long enough to cross straps but extra length there would make that an option for all. As it is, crossing the straps is only really an option for small to average sized adults due to the shorter length being out of reach for those with a bigger frame. Last up would be the buckles, they do their job well and hold effectively to a high weight but somehow feel a little plasticky compared to some other brands.image

The verdict

It’s great, it’s clever, and it looks well made. It will fit a good variety of adults and children, and it will be especially good at fitting those with smaller frames. In my opinion it will be best suited to parents wanting a carrier to suit two or more ages of children or those wanting one carrier from birth to toddler. Internal seats for newborns work but are always a little harder to use at that stage, so I think the optimum range, where it works at its best, will be with children 4 months to 2.5 years approx, although it will perform fine outside of that range. The range of extras in the bag make it a very good value option I am happy to recommend.

The Liliputi SSC is part of a range of new carriers from the Hungarian brand including mei tais, stretchy wraps and ring slings, as well as carrying coats, bags and accessories, so we are definitely going to hear more from Liliputi in the future.

Available to hire from 4/11/15 at WYSL

Liliputi Buckle carrier
From 99 Euro direct
http://www.liliputibabycarriers.com/buckle-carrier
Sling Heaven
£79.99
http://www.slingheaven.com/Liliputi-Soft-Baby-Carrier-_p_638.html

The Technical Stuff

3.5Kg- 20kg
Removable internal infant seat.
Minimum seat width 7 inches on newborn seat.
Carrier proper 13 inches with seat darting.
Carrier extenders extend to a 19 inch shaped seat.
Body height drawstring adjustable, max 16 inches into curved head rest.
Minimum waist measurement 28 inches, maximum 56 inches approx.
Perfect fit adjusters.
Removable sleephood.
Seat extenders as standard.
Dual Adjustability in underarm straps.
Crossed back only for smaller adults.
Back carry 6mo +

Fitting a 3.5yo.
Fitting a 3.5yo.

 

An exciting new space for our Wednesday drop in!!

Thanks to being so fabulously busy with all you carrying parents out there, our drop in sessions are moving to somewhere bigger and better.

SCRAP  is a social enterprise based in Farsley, Leeds which reuses waste materials from businesses and industry as resources for art and play. It is a large mill shop, packed to the rafters with interesting things to make and do – it’s real imagination fuel. Their cafe is an awesome space filled with open ended, heuristic play and an ever changing play space for little people. Along with a very decent cup of coffee, speciality teas and a delicious cake selection, it is a place I already visit regularly.

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The lovely people at SCRAP have invited us to come along to their cafe space to run our drop in services on a Wednesday, so you can come and play, come for a coffee, a slab of cake, some help with your sling and to pick up art supplies for the kids! As a big bonus, the mills complex of which SCRAP is a part also boasts Jacakboos play gym just next door, the ever fabulous Fingertips art studio full of messy play and projects for kids, an art gallery and a Mill Kitchen cafe.

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We will be there each Wednesday – starting this Wednesday February 11th – from 10.30am to 2pm, on the cafe space, for free drop in carrier help and advice, rentals and returns.

if you have any questions about our new space, I have updated the How to Visit page with directions and accessibility details, but if you need any more information please contact us using the contact page or call 01132100855.